Registered Charity No 1174624

© 2017 by The Lonarc Foundation

Robin Miller (1942-2014)

Robin Miller was an extraordinarily naturally gifted musician whose delicate and sensitive phrasing was often perfect for interpreting the works of the classical composers. 

 

Sadly in 1989, Robin had to stop playing due to a debilitating illness.

 

He moved to Scotland in 1976 to play principal oboe with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra. He is fondly remembered by many of the SCO players and audience members, particularly for his performances and recording of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies Strathclyde Concerto No 1, which was written for him. He is also remembered in his recordings of Vivaldi and Handel.  Until recently, Robin was a regular in the audience at SCO concerts in St Andrews, where he made his home after leaving the SCO.

 

After graduating from the RAM, where he studied with Neil Black,  he was quickly appointed to become principal oboe with Ballet Rambert, a position Joseph Sanders now holds. Then moving swiftly on to Sadlers Well Orchestra, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, BBC Concert Orchestra, and then co-principal with BBC Symphony Orchestra under Pierre Boulez. 

 

He was a founder member of the Nash Ensemble and also played with Janet Craxton in early London Sinfonietta recordings with Stockhausen.

 

He experimented with other genres including prog rock with King Crimson in 1970 and features on their album Lizard alongside jazz pianist Keith Jarrett and Yes vocalist Jon Anderson.

 

Judy was lucky enough to meet Robin in 1978 commencing lessons with him before coming down to London to study at the RAM in 1981. Joseph Sanders also deputised for Robin during his last days of professional playing and after he left the SCO.

 

Judy would like to believe that Robin's style of playing and musicianship can be heard directly in the Lonarc Oboe Trio performances. We therefore should like to dedicate our early Oboe Trio recordings to the abiding memory of this gentle, generous and beautiful musician, who was forced to stop performing far too soon.